THE BIB WINE TIMES - It's not all bad news...


FRONT PAGE NEWS

Football didn't come home after all. The never-ending Brexit civil war, well, never ends.  Even this sunshine is bad news with gardeners eyeing their wilting hydrangeas with mournful resignation as the dreaded hosepipe ban looms...

Well dry your eyes people, it's not all bad, we have some good news; A NEW WINE! Our 'Les Grands Arbres' organic Chardonnay will be available soon and it's a corker. To celebrate we have our first guest feature below from Josh's Wine List which shines a light on this amazing grape and why it is so often misunderstood...

CURRENT AFFAIRS

Wine Car Boot, London 28 July -  Come and taste our wines at Wine Car Boot, St James's Market, London. It's a fantastic independent pop up wine market - entry is free, there will be lots of incredible wines, so just turn up and start tasting. You can find out more about Wine Car Boot here.

Please help! We can only bring five of our wines to the event so we need your help - please reply to this email with the five that you would most like to taste.
Cowdray Park Polo Club - The wines were on the road again on Tuesday as we travelled to Cowdray Park for a day of polo. It was semi-finals day and both went down to the wire. The BIB wine was flowing as the tension ramped. A great day all round.

FEATURE

'ABC: anything but chardonnay'
courtesy of Josh's Wine List
'My first experience of it was hearing the phrase ‘ABC: anything but chardonnay’ some time during university. For years that was my only thought on it, until one day I realised the grape in Chablis was chardonnay. Mind, as they say, was blown.

Chardonnay is an amazing grape. One of the few that can grow across cool, moderate and hot climates. In cool regions (like Chablis), you get bright, green fruit flavours like apple and pear. In moderate locations you’ll get stone fruit and in hot climates, you’ll get tropical fruit. 

Chardonnay can be played with quite a bit in the winemaking process too. Some winemakers may choose a process called malolactic fermentation which brings butteriness to it. Others may leave the wine in contact with the dead yeast cells (called lees), which adds creamy, savoury notes. It can be aged too, adding toasty, nutty or honey flavours to the aroma.

All in all, swearing off chardonnay is like swearing off wine altogether. Forget all your preconceptions and start tasting some chardonnay. Look out for Chablis, Burgundy (FR), Yarra Valley, Adelaide Hills, Margaret River (AUS), Casablanca Valley (Chile), Sonoma, Russian River (California) and Walker Bay (South Africa). '
And of course, shortly to be released, our 'Les Grands Arbres' Chardonnay....

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